On the Job Training: Using GeoGebra in Teaching Math

For the last several years, our Institute has been accepting on the job trainees from nearby universities. These trainees are undergraduate students taking up bachelor’s degree in education. As for our group, we are accepting students who are taking education major in mathematics.

This year, we have accepted two students who are on their third year of university studies. I have been handling them already for three weeks of their 6-week course. In this post and the next several posts, I will be sharing our activities during the training.

During our first meeting, the two students shared that they wanted to deepen their understanding on content and strategies in teaching mathematics. Since my specialization is on the use of technology, I have designed their training with the focus of integrating technology in teaching mathematics. This includes familiarization with various theoretical frameworks used in teaching mathematics using technology, using a software in creating teaching and learning materials, and developing lessons with technology integration. Once a week, we also discuss key content topics in high school mathematics and various ways to teach them.

The GeoGebra Interface (via Wikipedia)

At the end of the training, the students are expected to develop applets and lessons using GeoGebra. They will implement the lessons with me and my colleagues as audience. After the implementation of the lesson, we will comment on how the lessons can be improved.  Their last task is to revise the lesson. Their major output is a lesson plan.

For those who are not familiar with GeoGebra, it is free software that can be used for teaching and learning mathematics. You can download it here and there are various tutorials on learning the software here. GeoGebra is available on Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS and Android operating systems.  You can use it on laptops, tablets, and mobile phones.

Mathematical Tasks: Number of Solutions and Answers

Different types of mathematical tasks let us tests the various skills of students. Close ended tasks let us test students basic knowledge of facts and procedures, while open-ended tasks lets us elicit various solutions answers. In the book Mathematical Thinking, Isoda and Katagiri classified mathematical tasks into three types:

Type 1: one solution, one answer

Type 2: many solutions, one answer

Type 3: many solutions, many answers

Examples of such problems are shown below. The first task is a Type 1 task, or a task with one solution and one answer. Students who have already learned how to calculate the area of rectangles can just use the formula to calculate the area of the rectangle.  » Read more

CK-12 Lessons and Videos for Elementary School Math

If you are familiar with the CK-12 Foundation, then you are probably familiar with the free resources that they are offering in science, mathematics, and other subjects. Most of these resources are in Grade 6-12, but recently, they have starting adding materials in lower grades (see Elementary School Mathematics).   Included in the resources are videos that tackles mathematical concepts. For example, the video on Using Cubes and Creating Place Value Diagrams  introduces the concept of place value using cubes that are grouped into hundreds, tens, and ones. After the video, the students can answer questions in the assessment section. One sample question about the lesson above is shown below.

ck-12

via CK-12 Foundation

 

CK-12 Foundation offers K-12 resources for FREE in Mathematics, Science, English, History, Astronomy, Engineering, and SAT Preparation.



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